Engelske termer for sangstruktur?

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Claus Flid
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Engelske termer for sangstruktur?

Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:22

Jeg har flere gange skulle bruge ordne Vers og Omkvæd på engelsk men hvordan er det nu lige det er ?
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Ulrik Nielsen
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:24

Jeg mener det kaldes Worse og Aroundkvaed.. :spin:
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Alex - Aural Invasion
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:25

Vers = Verse

Omkvæd = Refrain
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Martin Frederiksen
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:32

Og når det skal være slang, så er det Hook :D
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Lars Winther
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:43

Omkvæd hedder da også Chorus...
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Jens D
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:55

Jævnfør den kendte vending: Don't bore us - get to the chorus :-D
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Claus Flid
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 14:56

heeps tak for hjælpen :-)
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Holger
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 17:42

Bro = Bridge.

Omend dette ord på engelsk næsten altid er det vi kalder c-stykke på dansk. Det nogle kalder bro på dansk, kaldes pre-chorus på engelsk. Andre bruger ordet bro præcis som på engelsk, altså om c-stykket.
Vagn Hollund

Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 17:51

Jeg bruger ofte "bridge" til at forklare stykket op til B (chorus)
C stykket som jeg kender det kommer traditionelt pop-set efter N°2 B-stykke
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Holger
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 17:59

Præcis, men det er *ikke* hvad de bruger i f.eks. USA, der hedder det pre-chorus (som i øvrigt er mere brugt i Europæisk popmusik).
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søren-b
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 18:31

amerikanere bruger i stedet for c-stykke bare udtrykket "the 8 bars"
livet er at kører rundt på sin puch maxi og synge
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Holger
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 18:32

Dett har jeg ikke hørt. Men de bruger som jeg siger "bridge" om c-stykket.
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Lars Winther
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 19:17

Jeg lærte engang i tidernes morgen at "broen" var den man "gik over" for at komme til omkvædet... :lol:
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Holger
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 19:44

Præcis, men i USA mener man det som forbinder de to "halv"dele af sangen.
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Lars Winther
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 19:46

Arh... clever (som man siger på Engelsk :-D )
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Holger
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Indlæg Skrevet: 30. jul 2006, 19:49

Prøv at checke denne artikel:
http://www.ascap.com/jam/read_about/constrIntro.html

Et lille uddrag som handler om ovenstående emne
3) BRIDGE
Also called a "release" or "break," the bridge provides a variety of important functions in a song. Musically, it helps to relieve the "boredom factor," and for that reason, it's usually placed about 2/3 of the way into the song (after the second chorus in a verse/chorus form), which is normally when people may begin to tire of melodic repetition. The bridge zaps the listener back to attention and helps them to refocus on the song, and can add drama in many other ways. Musically, you can use any of the devices used to achieve contrast described in the "Song Dynamics" segment that we'll get to later.

The bridge can also be purely instrumental. The melody should sound as different as possible without sounding like it belongs in a different song. Lyrically, it offers you the opportunity to change gears. You can reiterate the philosophy of the song in a whole new way by changing the "person" (going from "they" or "you" to "I" for example), going from specific imagery to something more abstract (or vice versa), or using it as an "aside" or for outside commentary.

The basic characteristics of a bridge are:

1. Its melody is different from the verse and the chorus, although occasionally a portion of the verse or chorus melody may be used in the bridge.

2. It usually doesn't contain the title and/or hook, but that's certainly not the law. That decision may depend on how many times you have repeated the title/hook in the song. If you haven't done it much, it might be smart to use it again.

3. It usually occurs only once in the song, but it can be repeated in an extended verse/chorus form. Two things prevent that kind of bridge from sounding like a chorus: it usually doesn't contain the title and/or hook, and if it is constructed correctly, its melody leads back into the verse or chorus.

>4. It is rarely over eight bars long. After all, it's supposed to be a diversion, not a whole piece in itself. It may be two bars or two lines or whatever is needed to fulfill the function of breaking up the song.

5. It is entirely optional.

4) PRE-CHORUS
Pre-choruses are melodic segments that are different from the verses, chorus or bridge. They are known by many other names (climb, lift, channel, B-section, pre-hook, setup), all of which give you clues about their function. They're used extensively in contemporary music -- primarily in pop and r&b -- although they're currently gaining popularity in country/pop. Producers seem to favor pre-choruses to help create an additional level of interest to keep a song exciting, particularly in up-tempo or dance songs where extra length and faster tempo make a straight verse/chorus form feel too repetitive.

When you first hear a pre-chorus, it almost sounds as if it is going to be the chorus, until you hear the chorus that follows. It should increase the tension to the point where there is a great sense of release going into the chorus. Some examples of hits that use a pre-chorus are: "End Of The Road," Boyz II Men (written by Kenneth Edmonds, Antonio Reid, Daryl Simmons); "Any Man Of Mine," Shania Twain (Robert John Lange, Shania Twain); "I Can Love You Like That," All-4-One, John Michael Montgomery (Steve Diamond, Jennifer Kimball, Maribeth Derry), "Every Day Is A Winding Road" Sheryl Crow (Sheryl Crow, Jeff Trott, Brian Macleod). The basic characteristics of pre-choruses are:

1. They directly precede the chorus.

2. They usually precede each chorus, but may be dropped after the first couple of times if you can find a way (musically) to get back to the chorus without it.

3. Lyrics can be the same each time or different. Melodies are the same each time.

4. The length varies, like the bridge, from one line to four. Pre-choruses usually last no longer than eight bars.

5. Musically, they build tension to increase the feeling of release in the chorus.

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